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Date of Award

5-20-2014

Document Type

Thesis and Dissertation-ISU Access Only

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Department of Educational Administration and Foundations: Educational Administration

First Advisor

Elizabeth T. Lugg

Abstract

A CASE STUDY USING A QUALITATIVE RESEARCH TECHNIQUE TO

INVESTIGATE THE PERCEPTIONS OF ADMINISTRATION,

FACULTY, AND STUDENTS, REGARDING TWO

STAND-ALONE CAREER CENTERS IN ILLINOIS

Anthony Jay Plese

157 Pages August 2014

The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore the process by which a

vocational facility (career center) operates, and to identify administration, faculty, and

student perceptions as each may affect decision-making regarding the area of study, why

students chose the vocational center they are attending, and perceptions that define a

quality center. This research study asked open-ended questions to help the reader

understand how administrators, teachers, and students perceive their career center and

their role and purpose at hat center. Throughout the paper two terms were used

interchangeably: vocational education (VE) and career and technical education (CTE).

The practitioners and students involved in this study were from two area vocational

facilities in north central Illinois that provide skill training for eleventh and twelfth grade

students. The participants were interviewed using a semi-structured protocol. There

were also observations from the interviewer of the students and faculty chosen for the

project. The daily operations of each center were documented as part of the observation

process. The following themes evolved from the research questions: skills, certification,

licensure, dual credit, hands-on learning, engaged learning, and the ability to increase

occupational skills or secure employment after high school. The researcher believes the study shows different perceptions from the teachers, students, and administration

regarding the importance and reasons for vocational education.

Comments

Imported from ProQuest Plese_ilstu_0092E_10282.pdf

Page Count

171

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