Date of Award

10-13-2014

Document Type

Thesis and Dissertation

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Department of Agriculture

First Advisor

Rick C. Whitacre

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to provide quantitative evidence linking food aid delivery mode and its correlation with food production in the recipient nation. Debate over the best way to provide food aid to developing countries inspired this study. The three delivery modes used for this study were direct transfer, locally purchase, and triangular purchase. Food aid data was available from The World Food Programme and food production indices were available from The World Bank. Correlations between the independent variable (food aid quantity by delivery mode) and dependent variable (food production index) were examined using the coefficient of determination, which is the Pearson correlation coefficient squared. For direct transfer food aid (aid originating from the donor country), statistically significant negative correlations were found for 17 of the 42 trials. For locally procured food aid (aid originating in recipient country), statistically significant positive correlations were found for 28 of the 42 trials. For triangular purchase (aid originating in a third country), statistically significant negative correlations were found for 8 of the 42 trials, while statistically significant positive correlations were found for 6 of the 42 trials. The conclusion of the study was that direct transfer food aid generally has a negative correlation with food production, locally procured food aid has a positive correlation with food production, and triangular purchase has no clear correlation with food production. Locally purchased food aid is recommended as the optimal form of food aid in order to ensure food security.

Comments

Imported from ProQuest Wolf_ilstu_0092N_10387.pdf

Page Count

44

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