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Date of Award

2-22-2015

Document Type

Thesis and Dissertation-ISU Access Only

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department

Department of Educational Administration and Foundations: Educational Administration

First Advisor

Wendy G. Troxel

Abstract

HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPALS AND SELF-EFFICACY: A PHENOMENOLOGICAL EXAMINATION INTO THE BELIEF IN ABILITY

TO PERFORM THE PRINCIPALSHIP

Michael Miller

151 Pages May 2015

This study examined the experiences of high school principals related to the development of the principals' self-efficacy, that is, the belief in their ability to perform the principalship and to explicate meanings and essences from their experiences. The study sought to apply the explicated meanings and essences of the principals' experiences to contribute to further identification of factors that contribute to the self-efficacy development of high school principals, given the contexts of their experiences. The study was designed to answer the following research questions: (a) How do high school principals describe the experiences and influences that affect their belief in their ability to perform the principalship? (b) What implications does examining the experiences of high school principals, as it relates to developing their belief in ability to perform the principalship, have on the development of systems of support, such as principal preparation programs and professional mentoring programs? With the focus of this study aimed at examining the experiences of individuals with the intent of explicating meaning, structures, and essence, a phenomenological methodology was used as the qualitative research structure.

In describing their experiences and influences, the principals in this study indicated that their belief in ability to perform the principalship was affected by (a) verbal and social persuasion--encouragement and validation; (b) vicarious experiences--observing and comparing; (c) mastery experiences--performing tasks; (d) stakeholder feedback--teacher, supervisory, school community; and (e) access to a professional network. Also, in examining the experiences of these principals, I concluded that principal preparation and mentoring programs should include (a) credible and expert mentors, (b) opportunities for observation and comparison, (c) engagement in mastery experiences, and (d) the development of authentic relationships and feedback.

Comments

Imported from ProQuest Miller_ilstu_0092E_10437.pdf

Page Count

161

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