Date of Award

10-14-2013

Document Type

Thesis and Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

School of Biological Sciences

First Advisor

Paul A. Garris

Abstract

Despite decades of intense research and a consensus view in the field, the work presented herein provides strong evidence that the primary mechanism of amphetamine action should be re-evaluated. Rather than depleting vesicular dopamine stores and promoting non-exocytotic efflux through the dopamine transporter in vivo, recent evidence demonstrates that amphetamine augments phasic dopamine signaling instead. This signaling modality is critical for reinforcement learning and is dependent on intact vesicular stores. The new findings support over-activation of phasic dopamine signaling as a common mechanism in the addiction process.

Comments

Imported from ProQuest Covey_ilstu_0092E_10083.pdf

Page Count

152

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