Date of Award

2-22-2017

Document Type

Thesis and Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Department of Educational Administration and Foundations: Educational Administration

First Advisor

Mohamed Nur-Awaleh

Abstract

Focusing on faculty and curriculum at international branch campuses (IBCs), this study uses a qualitative case study method to examine faculty role in and perception of curriculum delivery. Interviews and observations were conducted at a midwestern institution and it’s European IBC. The areas of investigation include faculty involvement in curricular decision making, modifications for curricular delivery at the course and program level, communication between campuses, perceived differences and similarities between campuses, and professional development opportunities through the institution. The aim of this study was to gain insights into the program-level curriculum and course decision-making and delivery at international branch campuses and into faculty perceptions of their role in the delivery. The data were analyzed through the framework of micropolitics (Ball, 1987; Blase, 1991) and neoliberalism. The findings from this study provides insights about learning and teaching at IBCs for administrators, faculty, and students at both home and host campuses of IBCs. The findings indicate that a high level of autonomy along with coordination and collaboration with the home campus is important in IBC curriculum delivery.

Comments

Imported from ProQuest List_ilstu_0092E_10910.pdf

Page Count

164

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