Date of Award

3-5-2017

Document Type

Thesis and Dissertation

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

School of Kinesiology and Recreation

First Advisor

David Q. Thomas

Abstract

Rugby Union is a physically demanding sport requiring a variety of anthropometric and physiological characteristics to maximize performance. Factors such as muscular power, speed, agility, maximal aerobic power, mobility, and body composition all factor into player performance. PURPOSE: To determine changes in body composition, anthropometric and physiological characteristics of collegiate rugby union players throughout a competitive season. METHODS: Participants included 37 (20.3 ± 1.5 years) men from a collegiate rugby club. Muscular power (vertical jump), speed (10m and 20m sprint), agility (L-drill), mobility (FMS active straight leg raise and shoulder mobility) maximal aerobic power (VO2peak via 20m multi-stage shuttle run SR), height, body mass, fat mass (ADP), fat-free mass (ADP), and body fat levels (ADP and sum of 7 skinfolds (SKBF%)) were assessed during the pre-season (PRE), mid-season (MID), and post-season (POST). Training and match loads were estimated for each player by multiplying each player’s rating of perceived of exertion (RPE: 6-20) by the amount of training/playing time. RESULTS: PRE, MID, and POST variables were compared using a repeated measures ANOVA (p < .05). Paired-Samples T-Tests were used for post-hoc analysis to determine when the significant changes occurred (p < .017).

Assessment Pre-Season Mid-Season Post-Season ANOVA p-Value

L-Drill Time (s) 8.3621 ± .32 8.2321 ± .36a 8.5493 ± 0.42b p = .005

10m Sprint Time (s) 1.788 ± 0.1 1.892 ± .063a 1.91 ± 0.08a p < .001

20m Sprint Time (s) 3.118 ± 0.15 3.238 ± 0.11a 3.2087 ± 0.08a p = .004

VO2max (ml/kg/min.) 45.86 ± 4.37 47.6 ± 8.01 41.25 ± 6.4a,b p = .001

Triceps (mm) 14.85 ± 6.59 13.22 ± 6.9a 12.59 ± 6.4a p < .001

Pectoral (mm) 14.96 ± 7.4 14.11 ± 8.18 13.33 ± 7.35a p < .001

Thigh (mm) 18.56 ± 8.95 17.19 ± 8.27a 15.7 ± 8.24a,b p < .001

Calf (mm) 12.22 ± 5.49 11.04 ± 4.82a 9.81 ± 4.74a p < .001

Midaxillary (mm) 16.52 ± 7.21 14.67 ± 8.52a 13.81 ± 7.35a p < .001

Sum of 7-Sites (mm) 127 ± 52.43 118.19 ± 56.1a 115.3 ± 51.03a p < .001

Estimated Bd 1.061 ± .014 1.0641 ± .015a 1.065 ± .015a p < .001

Estimated BF (%) 16.6 ± 6.21 15.28 ± 6.74a 15.01 ± 6.39a p < .001

a: Significantly different from Pre-Season, b: Significantly different from Mid-Season. (Mean ± SD). CONCLUSION: The majority of positive anthropometric and physiological adaptations took place during the first half of the season when training was conditioning and skill focused. Increased maximal aerobic power and agility may be due to participants becoming leaner and adapting to the conditioning performed during training. The accumulating training and match loads, decreased recovery times, and shift away from conditioning during training towards game-simulation and team walkthroughs during MID to POST may have led to increasing levels of body fat and decreased fat-free mass, agility, speed, and maximal aerobic performance.

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Comments

Imported from ProQuest Smith_ilstu_0092N_10924.pdf

Page Count

90

Included in

Kinesiology Commons

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