Graduation Term

3-25-2024

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

School of Communication

Committee Chair

Joseph Zompetti

Abstract

This study examines the compatibility of Western-style democracy with the socio-cultural landscapes of Africa. Utilizing Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) within Fairclough’s three-dimensional framework and incorporating Afrocentric perspectives, the study highlights how language, power dynamics, and sociocultural practices shape the discourse on democracy in Africa. Pan-Africanism and (neo)colonialism emphasize the quest for African self-determination and the need for indigenous governance structures. The study suggests a Pan-African government structure rooted in collective values and cultural autonomy as a potential alternative to Western-style democracy. While acknowledging the limitations and challenges, the study underscores the significance of contextualizing democracy within African realities and calls for prioritizing indigenous knowledge systems for collective progress and development. Ultimately, this research contributes to a nuanced understanding of African politics, governance, and identity, offering insights for policymakers, stakeholders, and future research endeavors.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.30707/ETD2024.20240618063948814138.999974

Page Count

156

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