Graduation Term

4-9-2024

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Department of Criminal Justice Sciences

Committee Chair

Dr. Dawn Beichner-Thomas Beichner-Thomas

Abstract

Asian Americans are the fastest-growing population in the United States (U.S). They are characterized by parental attachment, school commitment, neighborhood involvement, and belief. The association between Asian immigrants and crime is multifaceted and requires an in-depth investigation. This study aims to compare the offending rates of Asian immigrants with those of other immigrants, such as immigrants from Europe, Central and South America, Australia, and Africa based on Travis Hirschi’s social bonding theory. The data for this study are drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), which is a nationally representative study of students in grades 7 through 12. This study uses Wave 1 in-home interview data consisting of a sample size of 1906 immigrants. The findings of this study indicated that Asian immigrants are no different from other immigrants in rates of offending. Overall, understanding the characteristics that contribute to the criminal behaviors of Asian immigrants may shed light on the creation of specific culturally informed programs for Asian immigrants, in the future. Additionally, policymakers can design new policies to promote family bonds, enhance school commitment, and foster neighborhood involvement which may contribute to less criminal activity.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.30707/ETD2024.20240618063950432913.999939

Page Count

55

Share

COinS