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Publication Date

4-2021

Document Type

Presentation

Presentation Type

Group

Degree Type

Undergraduate

Department

Psychology

Mentor

Dawn McBride

Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract

Recent research has focused on event- and time-based prospective memory (PM) studied in lab settings. The current study focuses on scarcely studied naturalistic time-based PM tasks. Time-based PM is defined as remembering to carry out a task at a specific time in the future (Einstein & McDaniel, 1990, 2005). Two experiments were performed to compare the effects of various delays and types of reminders on time-based PM. In the first experiment, participants underwent a time-based PM task at a 1-, 3-, or 6-day delay in a naturalistic setting. Half of the participants were asked to repeat the delay and half were not in order to examine whether requiring a second response would have an effect on time-based PM. In the second experiment, participants underwent a 1- or 6-day delay in a naturalistic setting and were given an explicit or an implicit reminder. Results of Experiment 1 showed that there was a significant decline in PM performance between the 1- and 6-day delays. When the delay periods were repeated, there was no effect on PM accuracy. The results of Experiment 1 indicate that a long delay decreases PM performance in naturalistic settings. In addition, it also appears that when PM tasks are repeated, there was no significant increase in PM accuracy. Data for Experiment 2 are currently being collected.

Notes

Authors: Lauren Black and Mackenzie Kelleher

Effects Of Delays And Reminders On Time-Based Prospective Memory
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