Date of Award

8-1978

Document Type

Thesis and Dissertation

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Department of Psychology: Clinical-Counseling Psychology

First Advisor

James Johnson

Abstract

This research was concerned with the relative effectiveness of professional and paraprofessional therapists in group management of college students exhibiting test anxiety. It was predicted that both the professional and paraprofessional therapists' groups would exhibit significant pre-post decreases in debilitating test anxiety. It was also predicted that there would be no significant pre-post differences between the professional and paraprofessional therapists' groups. Subjects were 26 participants in five Illinois State University Student Counseling Center Test Anxiety Workshops. Subjects completed a modified State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Achievement Anxiety Test at the beginning and end of the test anxiety workshops.

The hypothesis that both the professional and paraprofessional therapists' groups would exhibit significant pre-post decreases in debilitating test anxiety was tested using related samples !-tests on the STAI-S and DAAT data. Results supported the hypothesis.

The hypothesis that there would be no significant pre-post differences between the professional and paraprofessional therapists' groups was tested using analyses of covariance with the pre-STAI-S, pre-DAAT, and pre-FAAT scores as the covariates and the post-STAI-S, post-DAAT, and post-FAAT scores as the criteria. Results supported the hypothesis.

It was concluded that paraprofessional therapists compare favorably to professional therapists in the group management of college students exhibiting test anxiety.

Page Count

74

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