Date of Award

7-12-2017

Document Type

Thesis and Dissertation

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

School of Kinesiology and Recreation

First Advisor

Skip M. Williams

Abstract

The lack of physical activity (PA) and rise in sedentary behavior has become an increasing problem in the United States (Owen, Sparling, Healy, Dunstan & Matthews, 2010). The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS) recommends sixty minutes of daily PA for young people ages 6-17 (CDC, 2013). Despite this recommendation, the 2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data reported that only 24% of youth 12-15 years of age were obtaining sixty minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) every day (Fakhouri, et al., 2014). Physical education (PE) is one of the few environments where all children are provided the opportunity to engage in PA, learn the skills and knowledge necessary for engagement in health enhancing PA, and develop the disposition that lifelong health enhancing PA is important (SHAPE America, 2016a). It is recommended that students spend the majority of time during PE engaged in PA (SHAPE America, 2016b). According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS), 2010, PE should strive to include at least 50% time spent in Moderate to Vigorous Physical Activity (MVPA). Many PE programs are not meeting the goal of 50% of the class time spent in PA (SHAPE America, 2016b; USDHHS, 2000). Researchers have found that using heart rate monitors with children in PE classes increased the amount of PA (Duncan et al., 2012). The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of displaying versus non-displaying of heart rates during two 7th grade junior high PE classes on the amount of time students spend in their target heart zone.

The study took place at one Junior High in the Midwest United States, with an enrollment of 796 students. The sample size was two classes of 7th grade students (n=51). Students’ ages ranged from 12-13. The study took place during ten fitness based lessons. The lessons were taught to the classes with a visual display for five lesson and without a visual display for five lessons. The students’ percent of time in their target heart rate zone was monitored through Polar software. Average percent of time in target heart rate zone were documented and recorded through Polar software.

The results indicated that the mean percent of time in their target heart rate zone in the display setting (M = 62.41, SD = 13.52) was significantly greater than the mean heart rate percent of time in the non-display setting (M = 52.07, SD = 15.52), t(50) = -5.31, P < .01. No significant differences existed between males and females in either the display or the non-display groups. Students who participated in the display group first had higher percentages of time in their target heart rate zone averages in the non-display setting (M = 62.9, SD = 9.41) than the students who participated in the display setting second (M = 42.44, SD = 13.42). Students who participated in the non-display group first had lower percentages of time in their target heart rate zone averages in the display setting (M = 56.4, SD = 14.05) than the students who participated in the non-display setting second (M = 69.14, SD = 9.2). Overall, the use of heart rate monitors increased students’ time in their target heart rate zone.

Comments

Imported from ProQuest Marzano_ilstu_0092N_11063.pdf

Page Count

40

Included in

Kinesiology Commons

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