Date of Award

2-26-2018

Document Type

Thesis and Dissertation

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Department of Sociology and Anthropology: Sociology

First Advisor

Thomas Burr

Abstract

There is a difference between narrative and the quality of representation when discussing topics in mass media. However, the difference between narrative and the quality of representation is often ignored when same-sex sex is portrayed in media. Missing from a significant amount of the literature on same-sex sexual behavior is how mass media discuss sexual consent. To fill the gap in the literature, I will examine the following: 1) how mainstream media’s discourse on same-sex sexual consent (SSSC) is similar to queer media’s discourse on same-sex sexual consent, and 2) how media messages define sexual consent between same-sex individuals. To examine these questions, I analyzed 15 texts from English-language mainstream media and queer media outlets. My analysis found that mainstream media’s discourse on same-sex sexual consent is similar to queer media’s discourse on same-sex sexual consent due to the language used, the emotions conveyed, the definitions provided, the types of sexual assault discussed, and reader reaction. Additionally, my analysis found that mainstream and queer media messages use the cultural understanding of different-sex sexual consent (DSSC) and assault to define same-sex sexual consent. This research moves U.S. society towards a more accepting and tolerating society towards individuals who engage in same-sex sexual activity.

Comments

Imported from ProQuest Rooney_ilstu_0092N_11135.pdf

Page Count

96

Included in

Sociology Commons

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