Date of Award

10-25-2018

Document Type

Thesis and Dissertation

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

School of Communication

First Advisor

Phil Chidester

Abstract

In this project, I analyzed two seasons of the Pokémon anime to discover patterns of cultural “odor” management employed by the show’s producers and editors. In the first season of Pokémon, the producers of the anime included many symbolic representations of Japanese cultural artifacts within the visual features of the show. However, between the Japanese and US versions of the season, most instances of Japanese linguistic text were either “scrubbed” from scenes entirely or replaced with English text. These techniques struck a careful balance between including and excluding Japanese specificity within the first season, subtly expressing to non-Japanese audiences the Japanese origin of the show. However, in the twentieth season, producers removed symbolic representations of Japanese culture almost entirely – replacing these instead with symbols indicative of Hawaiian culture. This study traced the patterns of techniques used within these two seasons to manage this cultural “odor” to implicate the ways in which aspects of culture in television shows can prompt audiences toward developing interests in other cultures.

Comments

Imported from ProQuest Raes_ilstu_0092N_11337.pdf

DOI

http://doi.org/10.30707/ETD2019.Raes.N

Page Count

224

Included in

Communication Commons

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