Date of Award

5-24-2018

Document Type

Thesis and Dissertation

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Department of Psychology

First Advisor

Marla Reese-Weber

Abstract

The purpose of the current study was to examine various outcomes of self-objectification by creating latent variables encompassing several outcomes. Self-objectification was expected to predict self-surveillance, the behavioral manifestation of self-objectification. Self-surveillance was then expected to predict a latent variable termed internalizing states which encompassed: body shame, appearance anxiety, and sexual self-esteem. Finally, the latent variable of internalizing states was expected to predict a latent variable termed behavior in sexual situations which encompassed: sexual assertiveness, control over sexual encounters, and risky sexual behavior. The participants were 383 undergraduate women between the ages of 18 and 25. The majority of participants were European American, and all participants were offered the opportunity to receive extra credit as compensation for participating in the study. Participants completed a survey which included a demographics form and measures of self-objectification, self-surveillance, body shame, appearance anxiety, sexual assertiveness, control over sexual encounters, and sexual risk-taking. Measurement and structural models were tested to examine the created latent variables and the relationships among them. Self-objectification was found to significantly predict self-surveillance, and self-surveillance significantly predicted the latent variable of internalizing states. Finally, the latent variable of internalizing states significantly predicted behaviors in sexual situations.

Comments

Imported from ProQuest Cary_ilstu_0092N_11253.pdf

DOI

http://doi.org/10.30707/ETD2018.Cary.K

Page Count

57

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